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Found 2 results

  1. – New functions: get-sieve-tree sieve-merge sieve-tree-series sieve-tree sieve pick-prob gen-prob create-osc-thread get-osc-thread-from-name send-osc-data osc-thread-alive? end-all-osc-threads end-osc-thread – Howto Score/OSC/OSC Threads.opmo – Changes to OSC functions, please check the new OSC documents if you use OSC. – Musicxml display improvements. SIEVE-TREE This function returns a sequence of lengths symbols derived from tree-data in a given root, node and level number. Examples: Low density output: (sieve-tree 32 2 3) With a smaller root number and a higher level number we increase the density: (sieve-tree 8 2 5) In the following example we add probability values using lists of paired values to node, level and rest parameters. The first value in the rest lists is a percentage value of the length-rests in a node-level list. (sieve-tree '(4 2) '((2 0.43) (3 0.37)) '((3 0.47) (4 0.56) (5 0.68)) :rest '((20 0.43) (80 0.6) (0 0.7)) :quantize '(1 2 3 4 5 7)) Here we are increasing the length-rest probability and set the quantize to quarter, eight and quintuplet only: (sieve-tree '(4 2) '((2 0.43) (3 0.37)) '((3 0.47) (4 0.56) (5 0.68)) :rest '((20 0.43) (80 0.6) (90 0.7)) :quantize '(1 2 5)) The expression below will generate 96 bars of gradual increase in the density: (sieve-tree 96 2 7 :seed 43) Let's examine the original tree-data from the expression above. To do that we call the GET-SIEVE-TREE function with the same tree values: (get-sieve-tree 96 2 7) SIEVE-TREE-SERIES SIEVE-TREE-SERIES returns a sequence of lengths symbols derived from a series of tree-data in a given root, node and level number. This function allows you to control individual tree-data parameters ie. density results. Please note, every parameter has a keyword, except the root number. Examples: (sieve-tree-series '((8 :node 2 :level ((3 0.47) (4 0.56) (5 0.68)) :rest ((40 0.43) (80 0.6) (0 0.7)) :quantize (1 2 4)) (3 :node 2 :level ((3 0.47) (4 0.56) (5 0.68)) :quantize (1 2 3 5 6)) (2 :node 3 :level ((4 0.46) (5 0.58)) :seed 23))) (sieve-tree-series '((2 :node 2 :level ((4 0.47) (5 0.66)) :rest ((40 0.43) (80 0.6) (0 0.7))) (8 :node 2 :level ((3 0.47) (4 0.56)) :quantize (1 2 3 5 6)) (3 :node 3 :level ((4 0.46) (5 0.58)) :rest ((40 0.43) (80 0.6) (0 0.7))))) GET-SIEVE-TREE GET-SIEVE-TREE returns a tree node degree data from a given root, node and level number. This function is useful for analysis of the original tree-data used in the SIEVE-TREE function. Examples: (get-sieve-tree 96 2 1) => ((48 48)) (get-sieve-tree 96 3 1) => ((32 32 32)) (get-sieve-tree 96 2 2) => (((24 24) (16 16 16))) (get-sieve-tree 96 3 2) => (((32) (16 16) (32/3 32/3 32/3))) (get-sieve-tree 96 2 3) => (((12 12) (8 8 8)) ((16) (8 8) (16/3 16/3 16/3))) (get-sieve-tree 96 3 3) => (((16 16)) ((8 8) (16/3 16/3 16/3)) ((32/3) (16/3 16/3) (32/9 32/9 32/9))) (get-sieve-tree 96 2 5) => (((3 3) (2 2 2)) ((4) (2 2) (4/3 4/3 4/3)) ((4 4)) ((2 2) (4/3 4/3 4/3)) ((8/3) (4/3 4/3) (8/9 8/9 8/9)) ((4 4) (8/3 8/3 8/3)) ((2 2) (4/3 4/3 4/3)) ((8/3) (4/3 4/3) (8/9 8/9 8/9)) ((8/3 8/3)) ((4/3 4/3) (8/9 8/9 8/9)) ((16/9) (8/9 8/9) (16/27 16/27 16/27))) SIEVE-TREE example with root 8, node 2 and level 5: (sieve-tree 8 2 5) Analysis of the above tree-data: (get-sieve-tree 8 2 5) => (((1/4 1/4) (1/6 1/6 1/6)) ((1/3) (1/6 1/6) (1/9 1/9 1/9)) ((1/3 1/3)) ((1/6 1/6) (1/9 1/9 1/9)) ((2/9) (1/9 1/9) (2/27 2/27 2/27)) ((1/3 1/3) (2/9 2/9 2/9)) ((1/6 1/6) (1/9 1/9 1/9)) ((2/9) (1/9 1/9) (2/27 2/27 2/27)) ((2/9 2/9)) ((1/9 1/9) (2/27 2/27 2/27)) ((4/27) (2/27 2/27) (4/81 4/81 4/81))) SIEVE SIEVE returns a list of numbers to a given modulus, shift and maximum number. This function can be useful in generating root numbers for the SIEVE-TREE function. (sieve 4 0 96) => (0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96) Examples: (sieve 2 0 60) => (0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60) (sieve 2 1 60) => (1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59) Example with SIEVE-TREE function: (sieve-tree (sieve 3 4 14) '((2 0.43) (3 0.37)) '((3 0.47) (4 0.56) (5 0.68)) :rest '((20 0.43) (80 0.6) (90 0.7))) SIEVE-MERGE SIEVE-MERGE returns a list of numbers derived from merging a number of sieve lists. This function can be useful in generating root numbers for the SIEVE-TREE function. Examples: Here we merge two sieve lists, one from (sieve 3 0 96) and one from (sieve 4 0 96): (sieve-merge '(3 0 4 0) 96) => (0 3 4 6 8 9 12 15 16 18 20 21 24 27 28 30 32 33 36 39 40 42 44 45 48 51 52 54 56 57 60 63 64 66 68 69 72 75 76 78 80 81 84 87 88 90 92 93 96) Example with SIEVE-TREE and SIEVE-MERGE function: (sieve-tree (sieve-merge '(3 2 4 2) 12) '((2 0.43) (3 0.37)) '((3 0.47) (4 0.56) (5 0.68)) :quantize '(1 2 4 8)) PLEASE NOTE! The changes to OSC implementation - see below - are thanks to Rangarajan Krishnamoorthy. If you use OSC threads please revise your OSC files and make the necessary adjustments. The CREATE-OSC-THREAD function creates the OSC thread with a given target. Here we assign a name Reaktor to a remote-host: 127.0.0.1 and remote-port: 10000: (defparameter reaktor '(127.0.0.1 10000)) Here we assign an variable to our OSC thread object, this is important for sending the data with the thread and for ending the thread: (setf thd1 (create-osc-thread "thread1" reaktor)) To send OSC messages with the thread we call the SEND-OSC-DATA function: (send-osc-data thd1 '((0.0 1/2) (0.0 1/2) (0.08238555 2) (0.10876829 1) (0.12127061 11/2))) To end the OSC thread and the sending of the OSC messages, we call the END-OSC-THREAD function: (end-osc-thread thd1) The SEND-OSC-THREAD function sends OSC data and performs a small amount of "background" processing on messages in the queue when the processor would otherwise be idle. This function can be called on a created thread any number of times during its lifetime. (defparameter reaktor '(127.0.0.1 10000)) (defparameter time (rnd-sample 50 '(1/4 1/2 1/4))) (defparameter values (vector-smooth 0.05 (gen-white-noise 500))) (defparameter data (gen-osc-data 60 values :time time)) (setf thd1 (create-osc-thread "thread1" reaktor)) (send-osc-data thd1 data) The GET-OSC-THREAD-FROM-NAME function returns the OSC thread from a given name. This function is useful if you don’t assign a variable to the thread object. Note we are not capturing the thread object returned from this function: (create-osc-thread "thread1" reaktor) We can get the thread object using its name when we want: (send-osc-data (get-osc-thread-from-name "thread1") '((0.0 1/2) (0.3254655 1/2) (0.08238555 2) (0.10876829 1) (0.12127061 11/2))) (end-osc-thread (get-osc-thread-from-name "thread1")) The OSC-THREAD-ALIVE? function checks if the given OSC thread object is still alive and returns T if true. (setf thd1 (create-osc-thread "thread1" '(127.0.0.1 10000))) (end-osc-thread thd1) => nil Test: (osc-thread-alive? thd1) => nil The END-OSC-THREAD function will end and destroy a given OSC thread. After the thread is destroyed, you cannot send any messages to it. (setf thd1 (create-osc-thread "thread1" '(127.0.0.1 10000))) (end-osc-thread thd1) => nil Test: (osc-thread-alive? thd1) => nil The END-ALL-OSC-THREADS function will end and destroy all OSC threads. You cannot send any messages to the threads once they are destroyed. (defparameter reaktor '(127.0.0.1 10000)) (create-osc-thread "thread1" reaktor) (create-osc-thread "thread2" reaktor) (create-osc-thread "thread3" reaktor) (create-osc-thread "thread4" reaktor) (end-all-osc-threads) => nil Best wishes, Janusz
  2. have fun! andré ;;; TWO SIEVE-generators ;;; simple and multiple (the simple-function is part of multiple) ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; (defun gen-sieve (ambitus.omn intervals) (midi-to-pitch (loop with ambitus.midi = (pitch-to-midi ambitus.omn) with interval.cnt = -1 for pitch = (first ambitus.midi) then (setq pitch (+ (nth interval.cnt intervals) pitch)) when (<= pitch (second ambitus.midi)) collect pitch into bag else return bag do (incf interval.cnt) when (= interval.cnt (length intervals)) do (setq interval.cnt 0)))) (gen-sieve '(c4 g7) '(2 1)) ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; (defun gen-multiple-sieve (sieve-rules) ;sieve-rules => '((ambitus.omn intervals) (ambitus.omn intervals) (ambitus.omn intervals)) (midi-to-pitch (sort (remove-duplicates (loop for i in sieve-rules append (pitch-to-midi (gen-sieve (first i) (second i))))) #'<))) (gen-multiple-sieve '(((c4 g7) (2 1 12)) ((c1 g7) (3 5))))
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