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Found 3 results

  1. Lance Massey

    Use a database, or wrong thinking?

    I'm ok (not great) with music and algorithms, but I know *nothing* about Lisp, so please excuse me if I'm completely off base... I'd like to set up a system where I can tag parts of midi files and then use random weights to create new pieces that are similar to the source material. For example, I'd like to create a new melody from the openings of three different pieces where each of the source motifs are tagged with something like "dark" "rhythmic" "complex" In my day job the way I'd do this is to have all the motifs, melodies, basslines, chord progressions, descriptive tags, etc. stored in a database, and I'd run a query: "SELECT * from motifs WHERE tag LIKE 'dark' LIMIT 3. And then I'd basically use random numbers to select which of the resultant notes would play and when. I'd then rate the result, and if it's good enough INSERT it back in to the database to provide a new generation of material So my question is, would I need a database in OpusModus, or is there a "Lispy-way" to do this kind of genetic manipulation? If I need a database, any recommendations? Thanks for your patience!! Lance
  2. For programmers and developers Install the Quicklisp beta library manager. Evaluate: (load "http://beta.quicklisp.org/quicklisp.lisp") To continue, evaluate: (quicklisp-quickstart:install) Place the attached file 'Quicklisp Start.lisp' file into your ~/Opusmodus/Extensions folder. Edit the file and add the libraries you like to load. Example: (ql:quickload "ieee-floats") (ql:quickload "osc") About Quicklisp Beta Note: Opusmodus has its own init file and is not loading the ccl.init.lisp file at the start. Quicklisp installation and its use is not a part of the Opusmodus support. This post is mainly for programmers and developers that already know how to use the Quicklisp libraries. Additional installation: Post from Bill St. Clair: # In a shell cd mkdir ccl cd ccl svn co http://svn.clozure.com/publicsvn/openmcl//release/1.11/darwin-x86-headers64 Quicklisp Start.lisp
  3. marqrdt

    Extensibility in Opusmodus

    Hi, This software package seems to offer a large array of possibilities for a composer. I've especially impressed by the notation component. I did have a specific question though. I have a large set of utilities I've written in Java that I'd prefer not to have to port to another language. I am creating a web service for easy, language-agnostic integration with them. Does Opusmodus offer, either through its own library, or throug the underlying framework (I assume it's some form of LISP), a way to communicate with/query a web service? Thanks for any information. Also, a related question, possibly answered somewhere else, but I am assuming I could write my own set of tools in the language. Am I correct? Regards, Paul M.
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